Trump’s Supreme Court pick vows independence, sidesteps questions

Democrats on the Senate Judiciary Committee mounted a coordinated effort to derail the Supreme Court confirmation hearing for Judge Brett Kavanaugh on September 4, delaying the chairman’s opening remarks with more than an hour of out-of-order objections.

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Kavanaugh’s comments will do little to pacify skeptics, who have cited his opposition to a court ruling a year ago that an undocumented immigrant teenager who was in government custody was entitled to seek an abortion.

Pressed by Democratic Senator Dick Durbin, Kavanaugh defended a ruling he took part in issuing an order preventing a 17-year-old illegal immigrant detained by USA authorities in Texas from immediately having an abortion.

Leahy, however, on Wednesday cited emails that have been made public only in recent days that he said suggested that Kavanaugh may have known more than he previously acknowledged about Miranda’s information.

In his opening remarks released ahead of delivery, Kavanaugh sought to tamp down the controversy over his nomination, which would likely shift the closely divided court to the right.

While judges do, in fact, rely on legal precedent and the text of the Constitution when they decide cases, Clark said, they “filter the precedent through their personal beliefs”. “I am a skeptic of unauthorized regulation, of illegal regulation, of regulation that’s outside the bounds of what the laws passed by Congress have said”. “So sad to see!”

In an email on July 30, 2002, Miranda wrote Kavanaugh that he wanted to give him and another White House official “some info” related to an upcoming nomination hearing.

Feinstein also pressed Kavanaugh on gun control. They took turns yelling as senators spoke, with one shouting, “This is a travesty of justice”, while another shouted, “Our democracy is broken”, and a third urging, “Vote no on Kavanaugh”.

For a second day, protesters interrupted proceedings before being removed by security personnel. “At a time when the administration is arguing that protections to ensure people with pre-existing conditions can’t be kicked off their health insurance are unconstitutional, we cannot and should not confirm a justice who believes the president’s views alone carry the day”, she said. “We have not had an opportunity to have a meaningful hearing”, said Sen.

Sen. Amy Klobuchar, a Minnesota Democrat, asked whether a president could be criminally investigated or indicted. That is the period of time when Kavanaugh served as Bush’s staff secretary – and for which the White House has said no documents need to be produced because they involve confidential discussions.

“No one is above the law”, including those in the executive branch, he told the Senate Judiciary Committee. Some Democrats, including Sen.

Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, left, speaks with Sen.

Republicans command a narrow 51-49 Senate majority. When she paused, Senator Richard Blumenthal of CT asked that the hearing be canceled. Conservatives hope that Kavanaugh’s confirmation could create a conservative majority on the court, potentially for decades.

Senate Democrats have vowed a fierce fight. They fear Kavanaugh will push the court to the right on abortion, guns and other issues, and that he will side with Trump in cases stemming from Robert Mueller’s investigation of Trump’s 2016 campaign.

“Judge Kavanaugh, I am concerned whether you would treat every American equally, or instead show allegiance to the political party and the conservative agenda that has shaped and built your career”, said Harris.

Kavanaugh, accused by Democrats of being a tool for big corporations and a foe of the little guy, wasted little time in trying to humanize himself Wednesday.

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The back two rows of the hearing room are reserved for the public. “Last year you drafted a dissent in Garza v. Hargan”, committee member Sen.

A demonstrator shouts as Judge Brett Kavanaugh arrives prior to a hearing before the United States Senate Judiciary Committee on his nomination as Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court