Videos taken down from Vimeo for using the word ‘Pixels’

According to a report from Kotaku, DMCA takedown notices were served to Vimeo (and actioned by Vimeo) for several completely unrelated videos that happened to include “Pixels” in their titles.

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And the kicker: What about the damn official movie trailer for Pixels?

Enthura global, an ant-piracy group that represents Columbia Pictures, recently handed Vimeo a takedown notice for housing a number of videos with the word “Pixels” in their titles. “Entura has since withdrawn its takedown notice”, Turner wrote.

Sorry to leave you on a downer, but it looks like Pixels, you know that awful Adam Sandler movie, is responsible for a load of unrelated videos getting taken down from the Interwebs. The “infringing” video, also titled Pixels, was directed by an independent filmmaker and made entirely with his own material.

Incredibly, the only actual instance of Pixels footage being removed was the film’s trailer. In fact, a lot of them are completely unrelated personal projects and those don’t deserve to go down with Pixels. “I used a mix of stop motion animation techniques in order to tell the story”.

Pantone Pixels” was uploaded four years ago. In the meantime, we just hope Entura worldwide doesn’t start going after even more pixels.

Unlike the Patrick Jean film on which it was based, Sandler’s film, in which invading aliens take the form of giant, 8-bit video-game characters, has been reviewedpoorly.

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Pixels is so bad it’s managed to become a black hole of wank, with other creative works being sucked in and never seeing the light of day ever again. As Deadline reported in 2010, Columbia Pictures and Happy Madison (Adam Sandler’s company) were in talks with Jean to develop the 2015 Pixels, and Happy Madison had bought the rights. “It also says that for vimeo to accept to return the video online we have to give our name address and an assortment of statements”, wrote the non-profit organization NeMe in a post on Vimeo’s forums. Hopefully, Entura and Columbia Pictures will admit their mistake in this case but given past experience it seems unlikely.

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